Author: Shanes_Chic

Wanted a way to document and share all of the things/places/interiors & fashion that inspire me. Recent grad student of Interior Architecture. Currently: Working in Commercial Real Estate

STOCKHOLM- MIXES HOME

Jeanette and Husband Harald Mix own the famed Ett Hem Hotel (means at home) in Stockholm, Sweden. They also own a mansion just down the street from Ett Hem which was completed in 1916 and that the Mixes have been living in since 2002.

Ett Hem was designed by Iles Crawford.

“The process of doing the hotel made Jeanette realize that she had to circle back and look at her own place, but they only really used the kitchen and sometimes the library. Then everybody went up to the bedrooms, which were arranged like apartments. Is that fair?” says Crawford.“When spaces aren’t used, they die,” says Kirsten James, lead designer on the Mix commission.

“In the end we are, most of us, drawn to be together,” Crawford insists. Plus, she continues, “This period of Swedish architecture was the height of the Arts and Crafts movement, when the idea of domestic life was considered to be the pinnacle of culture.”

James and Crawford’s challenge: How could they retrain an imposing mansion to become an inviting home—all the while preserving the elements that made it special, such as the lacy plasterwork, noble mantels, and soigné paneling that Stockholm architect Isak Gustaf Clason conceived for the original owners, collectors Elin and Bengt Johansson, as well as his gala chandelier.

Psychotherapy helps. “We really interrogate clients,” Crawford explains. “What would she do in her study? Are the kids going to come in here? How are they going to sit? When are they going to use it? What if someone needs to step out and make a phone call?” That analytical deep dive captivated Jeanette, a trained sommelier and skilled cook. “It was an intellectual journey where I learned so much about myself,” she recalls. “Ilse knew all my values and all my morals: I had to trust her.”

That meant agreeing to Crawford’s radical suggestion to relocate the kitchen, from a distant corner of the main floor to the lovely but lonely drawing room.

What had been the kitchen is now a dayroom with a mix-master blend of furnishings—including antiques once owned by the Johanssons that Jeanette stealthily tracks down because “they belong in the house”—furry throws, and tall potted plants. The library is now darkly painted, so it beckons from the pale neighboring spaces and vice versa, and the original dining room has been transformed into Jeanette’s study. On the upper floors, the warren of bedrooms has been streamlined and equipped with marble baths. Also, Crawford cannily adds, none of the young Mixes’ bedrooms is “so palatial that they would only hang out there—and that’s intentional.”

Which, in the end, is all Jeanette Mix wanted: a house in which connections are encouraged and amplified. “Thank God our paths crossed ten years ago,” she says of Crawford. “It’s nice to be home.”

(Excerpts from Architectural Digest Article)

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ISABELLE STANISLAS

I discovered French Designer Isabelle Stanislas after reading a article announcing that her company So-An was one of the three designers asked to bid to redecorate Paris’s iconic Élysée Palace, the official residence of the presidents of France since 1873.

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Isabelle’s roots between Morocco, France and Israel have transcended in her mix of work from interior design and architecture to furniture. She is inspired by the permanent balance between the respect of the history and the daring of the modernity. Her first major commissioned job was to reinvent a private mansion at the young age of 22.

Isabelle is truly an inspiration and a designer I will continue to follow throughout my career.

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“To invent is not to question everything: it is to use the light and the space of what already exists and to project them into the present. Heritage is not condemned to live behind the window of the past. If we respect it, if we understand its codes and its values, then we can marry it to modernity without distorting it. After all, the past, the present and the future have always been the three sides of the same scalene “.

MAJA HOFFMAN – LONDON HOME

Renowned collector and an heiress to the Hoffmann–La Roche pharmaceutical fortune, Maja Hoffmann enlisted Designer India Mahdavi  to combine two neighboring 18th-century homes into a contemporary art haven

[From Harewood House and Nostell Priory in Yorkshire to all of Mansfield Street, the Adam brothers designed some of the grandest homes in late-18th century Britain, where their elegant interpretation of neoclassicism—dubbed the “Adam style”—was synonymous with sophistication. The surviving Adam houses are among London’s most sought-after properties. Hoffmann owns two, having bought the first in 2006 and then its next-door neighbor two years later.

Iranian-born, architect and interior designer India transformed the first house into a family home for Maja Hoffmann, her partner, the film producer Stanley F. Buchthal, and their two children. The second house was turned into her work space and a place where she hosts dinners for the Tate, Serpentine Galleries, and other art institutions she supports in a vast drawing room with a gilded-copper ceiling in which the artist Rudolf Stingel has installed a spectacular series of carpets.

“This is a beautiful house with lots of people, and a beautiful house when you’re here by yourself,” says Hoffmann. “It’s vast and very vertical, but it’s also cozy, intimate, and always luminous. It’s odd to say this of a London house, but its warmth and light always make me think a little of Naples.”

From the outset, she and Hoffmann knew that the original architectural features of both houses had to be preserved to meet conservation regulations. For the same reason, the two houses needed to remain separate. They are connected by a row of mews houses that, typically for London, run behind them, and a tropical garden designed by the Belgian landscape architect Bas Smets in what was once the courtyard of Hoffmann’s first Mansfield Street house.

“There are no rules with Maja,” notes Mahdavi. “All her homes are remarkable buildings and all very different. She doesn’t like things to be repeated and is incredibly open to new ideas, which makes her homes super-personal.”] an exert from Architectural Digest

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